Underground. Nature has been storing carbon dioxide (CO2) beneath the Earth’s surface for millions of years. Now Shell and others are developing ways to safely capture and store CO2 emissions. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology can significantly reduce the CO2 emissions that reach the atmosphere from hydrocarbon energy production and use. Long-term, it will be critical in helping countries around the world  to become low CO2 emitters. In fact, CCS is estimated to have the  potential to account for more than half of the CO2 reductions needed globally by 2100.

A quest for cleaner energy

To meet growing energy demand and enable people to have the quality of life they aspire to, wherever they live, all forms of energy will be required. Meanwhile, we must address the urgent and growing climate challenge with real solutions. CCS can significantly reduce CO2 emissions from hydrocarbon energy production and use. Long-term, it will be critical in helping countries around the world  to become low CO2 emitters.

Shell’s Quest carbon capture and storage project located in Alberta, Canada, is leading the way in CCS technology. It is expected to capture about one million tonnes of CO2 per year and permanently store it more than 2km underground.

In terms of CO2 emissions, imagine taking as many as 250,000 cars off the road, and it’s only the beginning. Globally it is estimated that CCS could account for more than half of the CO2 reductions needed by 2100. It makes financial sense too: according to the IEA (International Energy Agency) the costs to halve emissions by 2050 could be approximately 40% higher without CCS.

Quest builds on Canada’s leadership in CCS deployment and with a $865 million investment from the Alberta and Canadian governments, the combined efforts are setting a global precedent. Other countries are looking to Shell and Canada to learn more about CCS and its deployment. Information from Quest is being shared around the world to help future projects.

CCS can be deployed on  power generation and industrial operations. As more facilities are built, the cost of implementing CCS is likely to come down, helping grow the momentum needed to deploy it on a global scale.

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